Corporate Social Responsibility

Servest engages in the continuous process of ensuring its people, customers and partners benefit from an integrated approach to managing environmental, health and safety, employee, community and ethical issues completely and transparently.

The Servest Approach

Underpinning everything we do.

Here at Servest, we strive to conduct business in a way that is both ethical and professional and that also supports the strategic aims of our customers. Through discussion with internal and external stakeholders, four key areas of focus for CSR have been identified. These ‘Four Pillars of CSR” are where the business believes it can make the biggest impact and include people, the environment, communities and supply chain.

Read on to find out more about each of these areas, Servest’s current commitments and the plans for the future.

Arthur McKay team

PEOPLE

Distribution centre

Supply chain

Modern Slavery

Modern Slavery

Documents

Documents

Environment

Environment

CSR Summary

Servest charity work

Charity

Report Library

CSR REPORT

People

Subscribing to the notion that people are at the heart of any business, as a company Servest strives to be an employer of choice and to support a motivated workforce.

To achieve this, the business places a great emphasis on the diversity, health, safety and development of its people.

Diversity

Servest is committed to providing equal opportunities throughout the organisation and to eliminating unlawful discrimination both in employment and against customers, including discrimination by association or perception.

Servest has a written Equal Opportunities Policy to ensure that colleagues and members of its supply chain, do not commit unlawful acts of discrimination, and fully comply with the Equality Act 2010. The business has a separate Dignity at Work Policy, which is intended to keep the work environment free of harassment and bullying, so that everyone is treated with dignity and respect. Furthermore, Servest maintains and reviews the employment records of all team members to ensure that it strictly applies to the stipulations of the Equality Act 2010.

The company monitors the breakdown of the workforce to determine how closely it fits the demographics of each area we work in and ensure that there are no indications of bias. This process is reviewed every six months at a minimum and, if necessary, consideration will be given to adjusting the policy to afford greater equality of opportunity to all applicants and team members.

Diversity at Servest

Health & Safety

Placing a great emphasis on education, trying to eradicate the culture of health and safety simply as a ‘process’ which must be adhered to, and embed a culture of understanding.

Servest adopts a proactive approach that seeks to continuously improve health and safety culture and provision. We at Servest place a great emphasis on education, trying to create a more holistic approach to health and safety, and to embed a culture of understanding. This involves colleagues understanding the consequences of their actions, or inaction, and demonstrating the effects this can have on their own wellbeing, or that of others.

As a rapidly growing company Servest is continually assimilating new colleagues into the company culture, and impressing upon them the importance of safe working practices is the highest priority for its teams.

Learning & Development

A commitment to providing colleagues with the skills they need to fulfill their roles, be the best they can be, and progress within the business remains one of Servest’s core values. The last twelve months has seen Servest’s financial investment in learning and development increase by over 70%.

Each individual learns differently. We understand that. The businesses philosophy of You Choose empowers colleagues to embark upon a development path chosen by them, for them. There are opportunities for people at all levels of Servest to learn new skills and develop their current skills to grow within the company. From going through Service 101 when joining as a result of TUPE, the Hidden Talent Apprenticeships on offer to Distinction training for corporate reception teams and even studying for an ILM qualification (ILM Level 2 Pioneer programme aimed at team leaders, up to the Level 7 Alchemist programme for board members).

Environment

Servest understands that as a business its operation impacts on the world around us.

Taking steps to try and reduce this, activities to measure and minimise environmental impacts are conducted within the framework of Servest’s ISO 14001 accredited Environmental Management System (EMS).

Environmental Impact

Servest continually measures consumption of a number of natural resources.

Understanding that its fleet accounts for the largest proportion its environmental impact the business seeks ways to reduce fuel consumption and associated emissions. Steps have been taken such as modifying the vehicle banding that restricts colleagues to lower emission, more fuel efficient vehicles and the latest European Emissions Standards. This proactive approach has reduced fuel consumption and emissions over the last couple of year. Other resource consumption such as paper is recorded within the businesses EMS.

Servest’s reporting approach follows the Defra guidance on how to measure and monitor greenhouse gas emissions. The guidance is based on the GHG protocol for scopes 1, 2 and 3.

Environmental impact Servest

Environmental Management

Servest takes its environmental responsibilities very seriously, and activities to measure and minimise environmental impacts are conducted within the framework of the businesses ISO 14001 accredited Environmental Management System (EMS).

Board level responsibility for the environmental policy and EMS rests with Chief Operating Officer Johan Venter, and is endorsed by Group CEO Rob Legge.

The company’s approach commits it to continual environmental improvement of all activities, and the prevention of pollution, and states that Servest will ‘work with suppliers and customers both existing and new to adopt practices that minimise impact on the environment.’ Where identified, actions for improvement are implemented, monitored and recorded.

Supply Chain

Servest recognises the responsibility it shares with suppliers to buy goods and services, and deliver services in an ethical manner.

Servest want’s its customers to be confident that the individuals who make its products are treated fairly, with respect for human rights and are not exposed to unsafe working conditions.

The business believes that when ethical standards are in place, improvements can be made to worker wellbeing, productivity and quality, which benefits both our suppliers and our clients.

Supply Chain Ethics

Servest subscribes to the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) and therefore only trades with companies that abide by its base code.

These principles include, providing the minimum wage, standing against forced and child labour, ensuring safe and hygienic working conditions and ensuring no discrimination, harsh or inhumane treatment on employees is practiced.

Servest also employs tactics that in turn support its suppliers and help safeguard working conditions. For example, they aim to give suppliers clear and predictable lead times, making it easier for them to ensure its employees work reasonable hours. Moreover, as a minimum they make sure they pay suppliers a price that allows them to pay their workers a wage that they can afford to live on.

Servest has partnered with uniform suppliers to supply durable, ethical and high-quality cleaning uniforms to its employees. All of its branded products are produced in line with the Modern Slavery Act (WRAP) and hold ISO 14001 and ISO 9001 accreditations, committing it to environmentally friendly practices.

CIPS Corporate Ethical Register

After an intense twelve months of focusing on ethical strategies, Servest has proved its commitment to, and understanding of, the Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply (CIPS) code of ethics.

In November 2017 Servest Group successfully retained its CIPS corporate ethical registration, and its entitlement to display the CIPS Corporate Ethical Mark in recognition of its commitment to reinforcing ethical values across all procurement and supply practices. The CIPS Corporate Code of Ethics is founded on four pillars: accountability, ethical practice, professionalism and understanding, and commitment.

Servest is currently one of only 26 companies globally listed on the CIPS Corporate Ethical Register. The register includes businesses and public bodies, among which are the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the John Lewis Partnership, and Laing O’Rourke (all Servest customers).  Servest has received recognition for the proactive steps taken to ensure its entire procurement team has been trained in ethical sourcing supply management and it is now in the process of implementing a corporate code of ethics that promotes sustainability and responsibility

Modern Slavery

To ensure its employees and suppliers work in safe, fair and legal conditions, Servest is committed to a proactive plan to make certain that human trafficking and modern slavery are not present in any part of the business or its supply chain.

Tackling Modern Slavery

Throughout the last twelve months, Servest has placed great emphasis on how the risk of modern slavery is analysed within its supply chain to gain a greater understanding of where possible risks may still be present.

To improve awareness, Servest has significantly invested in training to ensure its employees and stakeholders have the necessary skills to identify the risks and signs of modern slavery.

Building upon the progress made so far, Servest has appointed a Modern Slavery working group including members of its Legal, Corporate Responsibility, Procurement, Risk and Compliance and Human Resources functions. The working group are responsible for overseeing progress towards tackling modern slavery and are the driving force for change within Servest.